Get Ahead of the Curve for J-Term and Spring

“Hey, you’re in law school—what do you think about the Supreme Court?” Chances are you fielded a version of this question from relatives and friends over break. If your response started with “well, in 1945 in International Shoe…” or “Erie says…,” keep reading to find out how to update your discussion points to the current Term’s cases in time for your J-term and Spring classes.

Here are some SCOTUS cases to be ready to raise your hand about in class this semester:

  • First-years, when the Court hears arguments in The American Legion v. American Humanist Association on February 27, you’ll be a month into Constitutional Law and ready to debate whether the four-story cross-shaped memorial on a Maryland-owned median violates the First Amendment. (This is one to follow also if you’re taking Professor Armacost’s Constitutional Law II: Religious Liberty.)
  • Ahoy! For Professor Rutherglen’s Admiralty J-term course, get on board with the issues raised in Air and Liquid Systems Corp. v. DeVries, docket no. 17-1104, about products liability for exposure to asbestos in ship equipment.
  • Show off what you learn about tax exemptions and the Railroad Retirement System in Federal Income Tax with Professor Yin or Professor Hayashi and Professor Doran’s Employee Benefits Law after taking a look at BNSF Railway Co. v. Loos, no. 17-1042.
  • Come into Professor Nachbar’s J-term course with a prime example of The Firm and Cyberspace from Apple Inc. v. Pepper, no. 17-204.
  • Assess the Southern Poverty Law Center and Cato Institute’s amici arguments about the impact of fines, fees, and forfeitures on the criminal justice system in Timbs v. Indiana, no. 17-1091, and share with your classmates in Professor Harmon’s Criminal Procedure Survey and Professor Shin’s Law and Public Service.
  • Get a preview of Wildlife Law the week before Professor Hynes’ J-term course by listening to the parties in Herrera v. Wyoming, no. 17-532, argue whether Crow Tribe members have treaty rights to hunt for food in the Bighorn National Forest.
  • Brief yourself on the circuit split over suits against companies for misstatements in tender offers before the Court and your Securities Regulation classes with Professor Kitch and Professor Vollmer address it in Emulex Corporation v. Varjabedian, no. 18-459.  

There are many resources available to help you get up to speed on these cutting-edge legal controversies. Apply your lawyer-in-training analytical skills directly to the case filings and lower court’s opinion—filings submitted after SCOTUS went electronic in November 2017 are on the Court’s website; for earlier filings go to SCOTUSblog. Also head to the Court’s site to follow oral arguments in audio (posted the Friday after) and written transcript (posted the same day). Find and track what experts say about the case through Google News, blogs like SCOTUSblog, and practice-area blogs discoverable in Justia’s BlawgSearch.

You can also head to our subscription databases for news on SCOTUS cases (and any lower court cases that interest you). Bloomberg Law is a one-stop-shop for learning about current cases. If you haven’t already registered, use the link in our list of databases. Its news is written for lawyers, covers cases in depth, and is updated frequently. Browse news specific to practice areas and set up alerts to receive headlines or keyword-specific results by going to Browse > News > Bloomberg Law News. To stay on top of the major federal and state cases across practice areas, head to U.S. Law Week. Lexis’ Law360 similarly specializes in legal news and is available in the Lexis database and in a browsable interface via LawWeb.

To find articles about your case, try keyword searching party names, terms like “court,” “judge,” or “justice,” and issue-specific words. Keep in mind that you know more about the law than the general public, so non-law news outlets’ articles will not have legal terminology. When your search in a subscription database generates a set of relevant articles, schedule email alerts of future articles with your keywords by clicking the bell symbol at the top of the results page. Are you getting hundreds of results? Narrow to the most relevant ones by using Boolean terms and connectors in your search—click the question mark in Bloomberg Law’s searchbox for a list of them and head to Westlaw and Lexis’ advanced search screens for guided forms. If you have questions about the databases, stop by or email us at refdesk@law.virginia.edu.

Photo: Inside the United States Supreme Court by Phil Roeder used under CC BY 2.0 / Resized

Written by

Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

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Mindfulness for Law School

Maybe you’ve taken yoga classes or seen mindfulness on the cover of Time magazine—but what does mindfulness have to do with law school? Learn how mindfulness tools like meditation, mindful eating and movement, and mindful communication can help you handle stress, improve focus, retain information, and enjoy the present moment. The Law Library has collaborated with the UVA Mindfulness Center’s Susanna Williams to offer introductions to mindfulness designed for law students since 2013. This Fall we are hosting drop-in sessions where Susanna will teach you how to integrate mindfulness tools into your everyday law school life. You do not need any prior experience with mindfulness, and you are welcome to drop in on one, a few, or all of the sessions. Stop in the Library’s 2nd floor Collaborative Classroom, 3:45-4:45, for snacks and to learn about:

  • Stress Less, Learn More (Tues., Sept. 18)
  • Mindfulness in Everyday Life (Tues., Sept. 25)
  • Mindful Communication (Tues., Dec. 4)

For a preview, check out the UVA Mindfulness Center’s free guided meditations online, and the Law Library’s collection of mindfulness books, CDs, and magazines in the low shelves in the first floor Reserve Room. For information about other mindfulness activities at UVA, like yoga and speakers, visit the UVA Contemplative Sciences Center’s site.

Written by

Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

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End of Semester To-Do List: #1 – Study Break

What do you need to get your end-of-semester reading, outlining, and research papers done? “Quiet,” “books and databases,” “study space,” “research expertise,” “massage chair”…. Massage chair?!    

Yes. Studies say taking breaks (even naps) makes you more productive. Challenge yourself to be more productive the last weeks of the semester and this finals period by taking ten-minute study breaks to[1]:  

  • Flip through Rolling Stone, Sports Illustrated, Essence and other magazines and newspapers in the first floor Klaus Reading Room.
  • Take a walk around the Library’s second floor to check out our annual art show and photos from the 1970 protest on the Rotunda.
  • Get a cup of tea or coffee and chat with friends in MyLab.
  • Browse for a winter break destination in one of the 57 Eyewitness Travel guides in the first floor Klaus Reading Room.
    massage chair
    Karl Lockhart enjoys a quick breather from exam time stress.
  • Try a guided audio meditation (check them out from the short shelves in the Klaus Reading Room). There are meditation cushions and mats in the second floor Collaborative Classroom space.
  • Curl up in a comfy chair in the second floor Collaborative Classroom space.
  • Eat grilled cheese hot off the griddle – stay tuned for date and time of this finals period’s grilled cheese night in the Law Library.
  • Watch an episode of The Office, Scandal, or your favorite TV series and movies from our Reserve Room DVD collection.

And, let the Klaus Reading Room massage chair work out some of your studying muscles’ kinks.

[1] Many of the resources mentioned here are courtesy of the Walter Whitlock Klaus ’36, endowment fund. 

Written by

Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

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Fall Introduction to Mindfulness for Law Students Workshop

Sign Up Now!

Law school teaches you how to think like a lawyer. The UVA Mindfulness Center’s introduction to mindfulness enhances your law school learning by giving you tools to focus, retain information, communicate effectively, and handle stress.

What is it? Eight, 75-minute weekly sessions of hands-on, expert-guided practice in mindfulness techniques like meditation, mindful eating, mindful listening, and mindful movement, led by the UVA Mindfulness Center. 

When does it meet? Tuesdays, 3:45-5pm, September 13 to November 8 (no meeting during Fall Break). There will be a half-day Saturday retreat.

Where is it? At the Law School.

Who can sign up? The workshop is open to all law students, and free of charge (sponsored by the Law Library). Enrollment is limited. To sign up email Kristin in the Library (klg3n@virginia.edu).   

Written by

Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

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Spring Introduction to Mindfulness for Law Students Workshop

Sign Up Now!

Law school teaches you how to think like a lawyer. The UVA Mindfulness Center’s introduction to mindfulness enhances your law school learning by giving you tools to focus, retain information, communicate effectively, and handle stress.

What is it?

Eight, 75-minute weekly sessions of hands-on, expert-guided practice in mindfulness techniques like meditation, mindful eating, mindful listening, and mindful movement, led by the UVA Mindfulness Center. 

When does it meet?

Tuesdays, 3:45-5pm, February 9 to April 5 (no meeting during Spring Break). There will be a half-day retreat on March 19.

Where is it?

At the Law School.

Who can sign up?

The workshop is open to all law students, and is free of charge (sponsored by the Law Library). Enrollment is limited. To sign up email Kristin in the Library (klg3n@virginia.edu). In order to get the most out of the workshop, commit to attending all eight sessions and the half-day retreat.   

If you’re curious about mindful meditation, drop in anytime at the Wednesday noon 15-minute meditation study breaks, every Wednesday in the Library’s 2nd floor Klaus Collaborative Classroom. Also check out books and audio about mindfulness, available in the Library’s Reserve Room.

– Kristin Glover 

Written by

Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

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Mindfulness Meditations Break on Mondays and Wednesdays

You’re welcome to 15-minute meditation breaks, every Monday at 3pm and Wednesday at noon in the Library’s Klaus Room (2nd floor). No prior meditation experience or registration required – just come on in, sit in a comfy easy chair, & relax as we follow along with a short guided meditation.

– Kristin Glover 

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Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

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Spring 2015 Mindfulness Workshop

February 5 through April 2

Register now!

  • What is mindfulness, & how is it helpful in law school/practice? Law students and attorneys across the country are using mindfulness techniques to improve their focus, manage stress, and communicate better with colleagues and clients. You can apply mindfulness to just about anything you do: mindful listening, mindful exercise, mindful eating, mindful test-taking.
  • What is the workshop? The U.Va. Mindfulness Center has been teaching mindfulness for over a decade. They have developed a workshop for U.Va. Law, sponsored by the Law Library. In each of the 8 workshop sessions we will learn and practice a new mindfulness technique, including: breathing meditation; mindfulness of emotions; and mindful movement.
  • But I know nothing about meditation….You do not need any prior experience to participate in the workshop.
  • How do I sign up? The workshop will meet each Thursday, 3:45 to 5pm, February 5 to April 2 (except for Spring Break). Email Kristin Glover in the Library to sign up. To get the most out of the workshop, commit to attending each session. The workshop is free to participants.  

– Kristin Glover 

Written by

Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

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Breathing Through the Final Week of Exams

Breathe through the homestretch of finals period during our last two 15-minute guided meditation breaks of the semester — Monday, December 15 at 12:30pm and Wednesday, December 17 at 3:30pm in the Law Library’s Klaus Room.

Anytime during finals period you’re welcome to take your own meditation break in the Klaus Room, where you’ll find meditation cushions, audio CDs, magazines, and books about mindfulness and meditation.

– Kristin Glover 

 

Written by

Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

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Take a Deep Dive into Lawmaking with FiscalNote

Want to keep up with what’s happening in Congress and in state legislatures? Check out one of the Law Library’s newest database offerings – FiscalNote. FiscalNote’s team of software and public policy entrepreneurs (including a U.Va. Law alum) have developed software and a fun, user-friendly interface that puts at people’s fingertips volumes of information that would take lots of capitol insiders tons of time to compile. FiscalNote gives you not only loads of information, but also crunches that information to predict whether bills will pass. And it delivers straight to your email inbox, via alerts you customize to your interests. Part of the start-up’s mission is to “foster a transparent political and legal system,” and they’ve been attracting press (see #5 of 11) and venture capital interest. See what the buzz is about by signing up for a password.

– Kristin Glover 

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Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

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Tools for Happy Lawyering through Mindfulness

Got a lot on your mind? We’re offering free tools for staying focused and being a happy law student (and lawyer)!

Mindful lawyering is catching on in law schools and law practices across the country. Students and attorneys report that practices like meditation and mindful listening are powerful tools that help them focus, manage stressful situations, and communicate more effectively with colleagues and clients. The University of Virginia’s Mindfulness Center, which has been teaching mindfulness tools for over a decade, has developed an introduction to mindfulness workshop especially for U.Va. law students. The workshop is sponsored by the Law Library and is free to law students! No prior experience with mindfulness or meditation is needed – the workshop is an introduction designed for all levels of experience. The workshop will meet each Thursday, 5:15 – 6:30pm, September 4 to October 23. To get the most out of the workshop, students need to commit to attending each session. Sign up by emailing Kristin Glover (klg3n@virginia) in the Library by August 29

In addition to the workshop, we’ll be hosting weekly 15-minute meditation study breaks in the Law Library’s Klaus Room (2nd Floor), every Tuesday at 3:45, starting August 19. Anyone who would like to drop in is welcome at any of these study breaks. No prior meditation experience is needed. 

Want to explore mindfulness and mindful lawyering on your own time? Check out the books, audio CDs, and magazines in the Law Library’s Mindfulness and Happy Lawyering collection. It’s in the 2nd floor Klaus Room.

 – Kristin Glover  

Written by

Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

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