A Weekend of Reflection

On the anniversary of last year’s neo-Nazi and white supremacist marches, we’re thinking about the ways in which the law school community has acted to promote justice in the past, the ways in which we can do more to promote justice in the present, and the library’s special role in preserving evidence of today’s struggles for future generations. We’ve selected several photographs from our archives that show some of the ways our students have engaged over the years with issues of justice, equity, and ethics. We hope that this weekend will provide an opportunity to reflect on the past year and recommit ourselves to working for a more just society.

1969

Representatives of the Law School’s Legal Assistance Society meet with government officials to oppose legislation giving governors a veto over legal services programs. (L-R): Office of Economic Opportunity Director Donald Rumsfeld, President’s Special Assistant on Urban Affairs Daniel P. Moynihan, Dean Paul E. Miller of Howard University Law School, Legal Assistance Society Projects Director Daniel D. Sullivan, and unidentified persons. See VLW December 11, 1969.

1970

Student protest
Students participate in a demonstration against the American invasion of Cambodia and the tragic slaying of students by National Guardsmen at Kent State University in 1970. During the protests, some law students wore armbands identifying themselves as “legal marshals” available to inform other students of their rights.

1985

Student speaks with migrant worker
First-year law student Karl Racine talks to migrant worker Sene Lanoix as part of the Legal Assistance Society Migrant Farm Workers Project, 1985. See VLW, November 1, 1985.
Student protest
Students protest the South African policy of apartheid, 1985.

2017

Candlelight vigil
Community members gather in response to neo-Nazi and white supremacist marches, 2017.

 

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Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

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