School’s Out For Summer

Now that summer weather is here and the library’s late night campers have gone out to enjoy the stars, we’re conserving our midnight oil for next winter. You’ll find us open during the summer on Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Reference staff are on hand Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. We'll be closed on Monday, May 30 (Memorial Day) and Monday, July 4 (Independence Day)… great days to shut the books, fire up the grill and head to the pool! 

– Cathy Palombi 

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Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

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Pardon Our Dust

It may still be spring on the rest of the continent, but with our 2011 graduates off to begin the lawyering life, it’s officially summer here. This is often the time of year when we stir up some dust so that we can spruce up our facilities for the fall. Transformation is already in progress in the Reference area on the second floor. 

  New Carpet Summer 2011 - Reference Area 014

Summer library users will find some noise and a bit of disarray in the Reference area for the next couple of weeks as old carpet is pulled up and new carpet is installed, but we promise the short-term pain will be worth the long-term gain. If you need a book that’s temporarily been displaced, just ask at the Reference Desk and we’ll find it for you. We’ll post updates on MoreUs as the work progresses.

– Amy Wharton

 

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Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

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Shine Bright This Summer!

You’re at your desk at your summer job, staring at a page of furiously scribbled notes about the first research assignment from your supervising attorney.  Only half the words she said made sense, and your notes are swimming before your eyes. How do you tackle this research project?  The Law Library can give you a quick guide to research success in your summer job.  The one-hour session will explain where to start a research project, how to research thoroughly so that you can be confident in your end product, and how to minimize costs along the way with free online research resources.  It’ll help you keep your cool all summer long.

Start your successful summer with one of three convenient one-hour sessions offered by the research librarians:

   4 p.m., Monday, April 18, WB103

   4 p.m., Tuesday, April 19, SL298

   12 noon, Wednesday, April 20, WB104

– Kristin Glover

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Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

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More than Bogeys and Putters: Golf Linked to the Courts

The Masters, the first major golf championship of the year, gets underway this week at Augusta National Golf Club.  Golf and the law are not strangers.  Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan, who served on the court from 1877-1911, was an avid golfer.  Justice Harlan’s love of the links was often remarked upon in the newspapers, and it was noted that he played the course at the Chevy Chase Club in Bethesda, Maryland almost daily when the Court was in session.  To read about Justice Harlan’s love of golf and other Supreme Court connections to the sport, see Ross E. Davies, The Judicial and Ancient Game: James Wilson, John Marshall Harlan, and the Beginnings of Golf at the Supreme Court, 35 J. Sup. Ct. Hist. 122 (2010).   One way to determine whether the library has this journal is to use VIRGO and enter the title into the search window.  The library’s holdings, both print and electronic access, will be listed.

Golf does not just interact with the law on the course, but makes its way into the courtroom as well.  In 2001, the Supreme Court held in PGA Tour, Inc. v. Martin, 532 U.S. 661, that golf courses were places of public accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act, and thus must make reasonable accommodations for disabled players.  This case granted Casey Martin, a player with a disability, the right to use a golf cart on tour events.   

Golf has also been the center of controversy regarding the discriminatory membership practices of some of its clubs—including Augusta National, home of The Masters.  If you are interested in reading articles on these issues, one way to find them is to use Legal Periodicals Full Text.  This database is available to UVA students and faculty.  A search in this resource for “golf AND discrimination” results in 52 hits.  While there is access to some full-text articles, for the rest of the articles the “Find at UVA” button will take you to VIRGO and show you where you can access the article in UVA’s collection.  Below is a screenshot from the result list in Legal Periodicals Full Text.

  Screen - Golf - April 2011(click for full-size image)

Finally, legal writers are also drawn to the laws of golf.  Noted lexicographer and golf aficionado Bryan Garner is perhaps best known as the editor of Black’s Law Dictionary, but he also co-wrote with Jeffrey S. Kuhn The Rules of Golf in Plain English.   

– Leslie Ashbrook

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Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

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UVA Law Professors Featured at the Virginia Festival of the Book

The week after spring break will see not only the return to classes but Charlottesville’s annual Virginia Festival of the Book. This year’s festival features appearances by several members of the Law School community.

Brandon Garrett’s eagerly awaited Convicting the Innocent: Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong won’t be published until April, while Paul Halliday’s Habeas Corpus: From England to Empire was released last year to glowing reviews. They will appear together in The Writ of Habeas Corpus and the Injustice of Wrongful Convictions, Wednesday, March 16th at 12 noon in the City Council Chambers at 605 E. Main Street.

Tomiko Brown-Nagin recently celebrated the publication of Courage to Dissent: Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement, the culmination of more than a decade of research. She will appear at UVA’s Culbreth Theatre on Thursday, March 17th at 6 p.m., in the program Engaging the Mind: Civil Rights, Women's Rights, Human Rights, moderated by fellow law professor Risa Goluboff (author of the award-winning The Lost Promise of Civil Rights).

At the very same time, Thursday at 6 p.m., Lois Shepherd, author of If That Ever Happens to Me: Making Life and Death Decisions After Terri Schiavo, will be appearing in the City Council Chambers downtown in a program on Health Care in America Today.

Finally, on Friday, March 18th at 4 p.m., Siva Vaidhyanathan, whose The Googlization of Everything (and Why We Should Worry) is due out this week, will be discussing the Internet giant’s impact in Google, the New Media: The Present and Future at the UVA Bookstore.

So there are lots of good opportunities to slip away from the Law School and support your professors. And that doesn’t even include Book Festival sessions on fiction, poetry, travel, and other slightly-less-legal topics.

 - Kent Olson

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Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

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