End of Semester To-Do List: #1 – Study Break

What do you need to get your end-of-semester reading, outlining, and research papers done? “Quiet,” “books and databases,” “study space,” “research expertise,” “massage chair”…. Massage chair?!    

Yes. Studies say taking breaks (even naps) makes you more productive. Challenge yourself to be more productive the last weeks of the semester and this finals period by taking ten-minute study breaks to[1]:  

  • Flip through Rolling Stone, Sports Illustrated, Essence and other magazines and newspapers in the first floor Klaus Reading Room.
  • Take a walk around the Library’s second floor to check out our annual art show and photos from the 1970 protest on the Rotunda.
  • Get a cup of tea or coffee and chat with friends in MyLab.
  • Browse for a winter break destination in one of the 57 Eyewitness Travel guides in the first floor Klaus Reading Room.
    massage chair
    Karl Lockhart enjoys a quick breather from exam time stress.
  • Try a guided audio meditation (check them out from the short shelves in the Klaus Reading Room). There are meditation cushions and mats in the second floor Collaborative Classroom space.
  • Curl up in a comfy chair in the second floor Collaborative Classroom space.
  • Eat grilled cheese hot off the griddle – stay tuned for date and time of this finals period’s grilled cheese night in the Law Library.
  • Watch an episode of The Office, Scandal, or your favorite TV series and movies from our Reserve Room DVD collection.

And, let the Klaus Reading Room massage chair work out some of your studying muscles’ kinks.

[1] Many of the resources mentioned here are courtesy of the Walter Whitlock Klaus ’36, endowment fund. 

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Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

Don’t Just Do Something, Sit There!

On-grounds interviews, moving into a new apartment, classes starting, not to mention moving to a brand new town for your first year of law school … the beginning of a new academic year can feel overwhelming! The law library is offering peace and quiet to help you ease back into the school year … and we’re not talking just about the new study carrels! We are building a collection of books (in print and on CD) and DVDs about mindfulness, meditation, and yoga. 

What does mindfulness have to do with law school and law practice?  A lot, say a growing number of law schools like the University of California at Berkeley, which has an Initiative for Mindfulness in Law and a student-run meditation group. As profiled in this recent ABA Journal article, “Mindfulness in Legal Practice Is Going Mainstream,” attorneys are also exploring its benefits. Hey, Google is bringing mindful meditation into its workplace, so it must be a catchy trend!

If you could use a deep breath or are just curious to learn more, come check out these new additions to our collection. They’re available in the library’s first floor reserve room, next to the DVDs:

This is just a start! Let us know if you have favorite books, CDs, DVDs about mindfulness, meditation, and yoga that you think your classmates would enjoy. Also keep an eye out for announcements about Library-sponsored mindfulness and meditation events coming this fall! 

 – Kristin Glover 

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Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

New for Spring, The Sequel: The Law Library DVD Browser

The Law Library is excited to announce the launch of its new DVD Browser. This online tool makes browsing the library’s extensive DVD collection easy and accessible from anywhere. The DVD Browser puts our collection at your fingertips with film synopses, reviews and ratings, related films, and up-to-date availability information. Explore the DVD Browser and check out your next film in the Law Library’s Reserve Room next to the circulation desk. A link to the DVD Browser is available on the Library’s homepage or you can visit http://lib.law.virginia.edu/dvdbrowser/.

– Loren Moulds 

 

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Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

Talking Turkey

In honor of the Thanksgiving holiday, the Law Library will close at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, November 23, and remain closed through Friday, November 25. We will resume regular (8 a.m. to midnight) hours on Saturday, November 26.

Do thoughts of Thanksgiving have you in the mood for Turkey? If so, the Law Library holds a number of resources that may be of interest. See, for example, Introduction to Turkish Law (Tugrul Ansay & Don Wallace, Jr., eds., 5th ed. 2005), Ergun Özbudun’s The Constitutional System of Turkey: 1876 to the Present (2011), or foreign law journal articles on Turkey via the Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals (IFLP) on HeinOnline. Or if you’re so excited about Turkey that you’re planning a trip there, don’t pack your bags until you’ve perused our Eyewitness Travel Guide for Turkey. If you prefer to enjoy Turkey from home, you might check out the Turkish film Auf der anderen Seite (The Edge of Heaven) (2007) on DVD.

However you’re planning to enjoy Turkey this Thanksgiving, the Library Staff wishes you a safe and happy holiday.

– Amy Wharton and Cathy Palombi  

 

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Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

Opening Day: Baseball and the Law

Today is the start of Major League Baseball’s season, which, as we all know, is really just the opening act for the 28th Annual Virginia Law Softball Invitational that begins tomorrow.  Baseball and the law have a long history.  The Supreme Court ruled in 1922 that Major League Baseball was not subject to the Sherman Act in Fed. Baseball Club of Baltimore v. Nat’l League of Prof’l Baseball Clubs, 259 U.S. 200.  You can use Westlaw or Lexis to determine whether this case is still good law.  Remember, confirming the status of a case can be an important research step.

The Ninth Circuit has found itself involved with baseball as it handles the Barry Bond’s perjury case (see, for example, United States v. Bonds, 608 F.3d 495 (9th Cir. 2010) for the opinion ruling on the admissibility of certain evidence).  You can track the current status of the case through a Wikipedia site dedicated to the ‘Legal Problems of Barry Bonds.’  The fans also make sure that baseball and the law stay friends; for example, in Thurmond v. Prince William Prof’l Baseball Club, Inc., 265 Va. 59, 574 S.E.2d 246 (Va. 2003), the court held “that when a particular adult spectator of ordinary intelligence is familiar with the game of baseball that spectator assumes the normal risks of watching a baseball game, including the danger of being hit by a ball batted into an unscreened seating area of a stadium.”

Not even fictional baseball characters escape the law’s long arm. Willie Mays Hayes, a character in Major League (Paramount 1989) who claimed he could “hit like Mays and run like Hayes,” makes an appearance in an amicus brief to the U.S. Supreme Court.

If you’re interested in baseball and the law, VIRGO is a great tool for tracking down books in the law library’s collection.  For example, a keyword search on baseball and limiting your search to the law library returns these books, including the law school’s own G.E. White’s Creating the National Pastime: Baseball Transforms Itself, 1903-1953 (1996).  The reference librarians are also happy to help you design your research plan—baseball related or not.   

– Leslie Ashbrook

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Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.