Don’t Just Do Something, Sit There! (Part 2)

Sign up now for the University of Virginia’s Mindfulness Center
workshop designed especially for law students, “Mindfulness for Law Students.” The
six-week series will meet each Thursday, October 3 through November 7,
5:15-7:15pm here at the Law School. Sessions will combine discussion, guided meditations and instruction, and
provide resources for students to develop their own meditation practices. To
encourage interactivity, enrollment is limited to 30 students and participants
must attend all six sessions. The workshop is free to students. Slots are
already filling – for more
information and to enroll
, email Kristin Glover at klg3n@virginia.edu.

Want to hear hard science on
how meditation changes the brain?  U.Va.’s Contemplative
Sciences Center
 (CSC) is hosting a talk by Dr. Richard Davidson on Change Your Brain by Transforming
Your Mind: Neuroscientific Studies of Meditation
. Dr.
Davidson
founded the University
of Wisconsin-Madison's Center for Investigating Healthy Minds
, and
conducts scientific studies of the impact of meditation on brain
activity. His study of brain scans of people while they were
meditating found remarkably high rates of activity in the part of the brain
linked to positive emotions. His talk is on Main Grounds in Old Cabell
Hall, Friday September 20, noon-2pm (doors open at 11:30); register on CSC's
website. 

Check out these books new to
the Law Library’s growing collection of mindfulness materials! Let us know if
you have favorites you’d like to see added. You’ll find these books and more in
the Library’s Reserve Room, next to the DVD collection:

 - Kristin Glover & Ben Doherty 

 

Written by

Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

View all posts by .

Don’t Just Do Something, Sit There!

On-grounds interviews, moving into a new apartment, classes starting, not to mention moving to a brand new town for your first year of law school … the beginning of a new academic year can feel overwhelming! The law library is offering peace and quiet to help you ease back into the school year … and we’re not talking just about the new study carrels! We are building a collection of books (in print and on CD) and DVDs about mindfulness, meditation, and yoga. 

What does mindfulness have to do with law school and law practice?  A lot, say a growing number of law schools like the University of California at Berkeley, which has an Initiative for Mindfulness in Law and a student-run meditation group. As profiled in this recent ABA Journal article, “Mindfulness in Legal Practice Is Going Mainstream,” attorneys are also exploring its benefits. Hey, Google is bringing mindful meditation into its workplace, so it must be a catchy trend!

If you could use a deep breath or are just curious to learn more, come check out these new additions to our collection. They’re available in the library’s first floor reserve room, next to the DVDs:

This is just a start! Let us know if you have favorite books, CDs, DVDs about mindfulness, meditation, and yoga that you think your classmates would enjoy. Also keep an eye out for announcements about Library-sponsored mindfulness and meditation events coming this fall! 

 – Kristin Glover 

Written by

Kristin Glover

Kristin Glover is a Research Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library.

View all posts by .

Got Books?

Got-books-2012

If a picture is worth a thousand words, this one has to be worth a few million! Finding AJM up to his neck in returned books is one of our favorite heralds of summer. We congratulate our soon-to-be-graduates and all of our law students on a job well done this year and we thank you for returning these many, many books. If you're preparing to graduate or just to clear out for the summer, the Circulation Desk staff is happy to help you lighten the load. (Not to worry about burying AJM — we're confident that he'll emerge from the pile well before fall.)

The Law Library staff wishes all of our students a fabulous summer!

– The Law Library Staff
(photo by Katherine Jenkins) 

Written by

Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

View all posts by .

Where in the World Is…Your Summer Vacation?

With finals winding down, summer travel plans may be refilling the nooks and crannies of your mind so recently occupied by the rule against perpetuities. While the law library is a wonderful resource for your study and legal research needs, we also maintain a collection of travel books in the Klaus Reading Room to help you plan an amazing summer vacation. If you’re considering a trip to Kuala Lumpur or just want some information on the best museums in Philadelphia, the library’s collection of Eyewitness Travel books are available to check out. If you are more interested in reviews of trips or inspirational stories of travel, the library also subcribes to National Geographic Traveler. This magazine reviews guided trips, suggests restaurants to visit when traveling in certain locales, evaluates hotels, and provides essays by travelers to inspire your next adventure. Like the guide books, this magazine is located in the Klaus Reading Room. These resources may be exactly what you need to plan your own trip, from Kiev to Carolina.  Happy travels.

– Leslie Ashbrook 

Written by

Leslie Ashbrook

Leslie Ashbrook is a Research Librarian at the Law Library.

View all posts by .

New Catalog Feature: Follow the Map!

The Law Library can be a very large place when you’re trying to find a book by its call number. To help simplify the hunt, we’ve just added maps of the stacks to the UVA Libraries catalog (a.k.a. VIRGO) to direct you to the section of the library where a specific book is located. To find a map, first run a search, then click “Availability” link:

Domke3

If there’s an active upside down teardrop on the “Availability” page,

Domke

click it to retrieve the map:

Map_sm

(The map will be larger than this screenshot.)

Of course, human help remains available, as always, at the Circulation and Reference Desks.

– Amy Wharton 

 

Written by

Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

View all posts by .

Talking Turkey

In honor of the Thanksgiving holiday, the Law Library will close at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, November 23, and remain closed through Friday, November 25. We will resume regular (8 a.m. to midnight) hours on Saturday, November 26.

Do thoughts of Thanksgiving have you in the mood for Turkey? If so, the Law Library holds a number of resources that may be of interest. See, for example, Introduction to Turkish Law (Tugrul Ansay & Don Wallace, Jr., eds., 5th ed. 2005), Ergun Özbudun’s The Constitutional System of Turkey: 1876 to the Present (2011), or foreign law journal articles on Turkey via the Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals (IFLP) on HeinOnline. Or if you’re so excited about Turkey that you’re planning a trip there, don’t pack your bags until you’ve perused our Eyewitness Travel Guide for Turkey. If you prefer to enjoy Turkey from home, you might check out the Turkish film Auf der anderen Seite (The Edge of Heaven) (2007) on DVD.

However you’re planning to enjoy Turkey this Thanksgiving, the Library Staff wishes you a safe and happy holiday.

– Amy Wharton and Cathy Palombi  

 

Written by

Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

View all posts by .

More than Bogeys and Putters: Golf Linked to the Courts

The Masters, the first major golf championship of the year, gets underway this week at Augusta National Golf Club.  Golf and the law are not strangers.  Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan, who served on the court from 1877-1911, was an avid golfer.  Justice Harlan’s love of the links was often remarked upon in the newspapers, and it was noted that he played the course at the Chevy Chase Club in Bethesda, Maryland almost daily when the Court was in session.  To read about Justice Harlan’s love of golf and other Supreme Court connections to the sport, see Ross E. Davies, The Judicial and Ancient Game: James Wilson, John Marshall Harlan, and the Beginnings of Golf at the Supreme Court, 35 J. Sup. Ct. Hist. 122 (2010).   One way to determine whether the library has this journal is to use VIRGO and enter the title into the search window.  The library’s holdings, both print and electronic access, will be listed.

Golf does not just interact with the law on the course, but makes its way into the courtroom as well.  In 2001, the Supreme Court held in PGA Tour, Inc. v. Martin, 532 U.S. 661, that golf courses were places of public accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act, and thus must make reasonable accommodations for disabled players.  This case granted Casey Martin, a player with a disability, the right to use a golf cart on tour events.   

Golf has also been the center of controversy regarding the discriminatory membership practices of some of its clubs—including Augusta National, home of The Masters.  If you are interested in reading articles on these issues, one way to find them is to use Legal Periodicals Full Text.  This database is available to UVA students and faculty.  A search in this resource for “golf AND discrimination” results in 52 hits.  While there is access to some full-text articles, for the rest of the articles the “Find at UVA” button will take you to VIRGO and show you where you can access the article in UVA’s collection.  Below is a screenshot from the result list in Legal Periodicals Full Text.

  Screen - Golf - April 2011(click for full-size image)

Finally, legal writers are also drawn to the laws of golf.  Noted lexicographer and golf aficionado Bryan Garner is perhaps best known as the editor of Black’s Law Dictionary, but he also co-wrote with Jeffrey S. Kuhn The Rules of Golf in Plain English.   

– Leslie Ashbrook

Written by

Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

View all posts by .

Opening Day: Baseball and the Law

Today is the start of Major League Baseball’s season, which, as we all know, is really just the opening act for the 28th Annual Virginia Law Softball Invitational that begins tomorrow.  Baseball and the law have a long history.  The Supreme Court ruled in 1922 that Major League Baseball was not subject to the Sherman Act in Fed. Baseball Club of Baltimore v. Nat’l League of Prof’l Baseball Clubs, 259 U.S. 200.  You can use Westlaw or Lexis to determine whether this case is still good law.  Remember, confirming the status of a case can be an important research step.

The Ninth Circuit has found itself involved with baseball as it handles the Barry Bond’s perjury case (see, for example, United States v. Bonds, 608 F.3d 495 (9th Cir. 2010) for the opinion ruling on the admissibility of certain evidence).  You can track the current status of the case through a Wikipedia site dedicated to the ‘Legal Problems of Barry Bonds.’  The fans also make sure that baseball and the law stay friends; for example, in Thurmond v. Prince William Prof’l Baseball Club, Inc., 265 Va. 59, 574 S.E.2d 246 (Va. 2003), the court held “that when a particular adult spectator of ordinary intelligence is familiar with the game of baseball that spectator assumes the normal risks of watching a baseball game, including the danger of being hit by a ball batted into an unscreened seating area of a stadium.”

Not even fictional baseball characters escape the law’s long arm. Willie Mays Hayes, a character in Major League (Paramount 1989) who claimed he could “hit like Mays and run like Hayes,” makes an appearance in an amicus brief to the U.S. Supreme Court.

If you’re interested in baseball and the law, VIRGO is a great tool for tracking down books in the law library’s collection.  For example, a keyword search on baseball and limiting your search to the law library returns these books, including the law school’s own G.E. White’s Creating the National Pastime: Baseball Transforms Itself, 1903-1953 (1996).  The reference librarians are also happy to help you design your research plan—baseball related or not.   

– Leslie Ashbrook

Written by

Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

View all posts by .

UVA Law Professors Featured at the Virginia Festival of the Book

The week after spring break will see not only the return to classes but Charlottesville’s annual Virginia Festival of the Book. This year’s festival features appearances by several members of the Law School community.

Brandon Garrett’s eagerly awaited Convicting the Innocent: Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong won’t be published until April, while Paul Halliday’s Habeas Corpus: From England to Empire was released last year to glowing reviews. They will appear together in The Writ of Habeas Corpus and the Injustice of Wrongful Convictions, Wednesday, March 16th at 12 noon in the City Council Chambers at 605 E. Main Street.

Tomiko Brown-Nagin recently celebrated the publication of Courage to Dissent: Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement, the culmination of more than a decade of research. She will appear at UVA’s Culbreth Theatre on Thursday, March 17th at 6 p.m., in the program Engaging the Mind: Civil Rights, Women's Rights, Human Rights, moderated by fellow law professor Risa Goluboff (author of the award-winning The Lost Promise of Civil Rights).

At the very same time, Thursday at 6 p.m., Lois Shepherd, author of If That Ever Happens to Me: Making Life and Death Decisions After Terri Schiavo, will be appearing in the City Council Chambers downtown in a program on Health Care in America Today.

Finally, on Friday, March 18th at 4 p.m., Siva Vaidhyanathan, whose The Googlization of Everything (and Why We Should Worry) is due out this week, will be discussing the Internet giant’s impact in Google, the New Media: The Present and Future at the UVA Bookstore.

So there are lots of good opportunities to slip away from the Law School and support your professors. And that doesn’t even include Book Festival sessions on fiction, poetry, travel, and other slightly-less-legal topics.

 - Kent Olson

Written by

Arthur J. Morris Law Library

The Arthur J. Morris Law Library is the home of research for students and faculty at the University of Virginia School of Law.

View all posts by .