Our Annual Art Show, “We The People”

On Thursday night, the Law Library will hold a reception to express gratitude to the sixteen photographers whose work comprises this year’s art show, “We The People.” Curated by Stacey Evans, the exhibit features works from photographers from Charlottesville and elsewhere in Virginia and D.C..

The show looks at different ways that photographers document and photograph people. Says Evans, “[F]or a photography exhibit, [We The People] seemed an all-encompassing title to give me the opportunity to look at different ways that photographers document and photograph people throughout the country.” In selecting the individual images, Evans looked at different topics – race, religion, borders, personas, and identities – featuring people throughout the United States. Some images capture people engaged in the “daily actions that we go through as a citizen,” such as riding a train or a bus. At the north end of the exhibit is the “Mangini Studio Series,” a collaborative project of Gordon Stettinius and Terry Brown. Over an eight-year period, Stettinius in various reinventions of his persona, and Brown chronicled the transformations in a series of studio portraits. The subject of a TEDx talk, the series explores “how attitudes and impressions toward people can shift based on their appearance.” 

Says Evans, “As people walk through and look at the exhibit, I want them to look and question at the different perspectives … and the different way that we interpret, look at images, look at people, and embrace differences … and understand that we might come from a different place, but that there is a ‘we’ in “We The People.” But … question who is that ‘we,’ and redefine, “Who is your ‘we’?”

The reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. on the second floor of the Law Library. It is open to the public.

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Amy Wharton

Amy Wharton has been the Research & Web Services / Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library at the University of Virginia School of Law since 2008.

A Resource Guide to Mindfulness at the U.Va. Law Library

A Resource Guide to Mindfulness
A Resource Guide to Mindfulness.

Integrating mindfulness practices into law school life can lead to less stress, and ultimately, to better career performance. For students interested in learning about mindfulness, we have a workshop, books, audio materials, and twice-weekly meditation sessions. Our latest web guide by Kristin Glover gathers information about all of these events, programs and resources into one place.

Visit “Mindfulness Resources” under “Services” on our website home page and explore!

– Amy Wharton 

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Amy Wharton

Amy Wharton has been the Research & Web Services / Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library at the University of Virginia School of Law since 2008.

Virginia Lawyer: Mindfulness in Law Schools and Legal Practice

The June 2015 issue of the Virginia Lawyer features an article by U.Va. law librarian Kristin Glover, “Mindfulness in Law Schools and Legal Practice.” The article discusses the emergence of mindfulness programs at U.Va. and other law schools. Glover spearheads the Law Library’s mindfulness program, which offers mindfulness workshops for law students, a collection of mindfulness-related books and materials, and an ongoing series of twice weekly meditation sessions

– Amy Wharton 

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Amy Wharton

Amy Wharton has been the Research & Web Services / Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library at the University of Virginia School of Law since 2008.

Yes, Virginia, There is an Arthur J. Morris

Some of "The Many Faces of AJM"
Some of “The Many Faces of AJM.”

 

His name adorns the library entrance, extending a silent welcome to all in our community who seek to learn the law. Though he never utters a word aloud (it is a library, after all), his face faithfully greets us every day. He is a staunch promoter of our events. Around holidays, he reminds us to celebrate our good times, then he is wholly empathetic during our times of greatest stress.

Morris and Librarian Frances Farmer
Morris with law librarian Frances Farmer at the naming of the Arthur J. Morris Law Library, c. 1970. (Photo from U.Va. Law Library Special Collections).

Who was Arthur J. Morris before he became the name and the face of the University of Virginia Law Library? North Carolina writer and commentator Warren Bingham tells us about Morris in his article just published in the Winter 2014 issue of Carolina Banker. In “A North Carolina Native You Should Know: Arthur J. Morris,” Bingham shares that Morris had to finance his own education at the Law School (’01) after his father learned of his gambling and cut off finances. Morris went into banking after law school, eventually creating a new kind of bank that gave credit-seeking wage workers an alternative to loan sharks. The Morris Banks became established in 40 states and helped create the American middle class.

Bingham calls Morris “the father of consumer credit in America.” We’ll still call him AJM.

– Amy Wharton 

 

 

Published by

Amy Wharton

Amy Wharton has been the Research & Web Services / Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library at the University of Virginia School of Law since 2008.

Dengrove Art Show

The Law Library is pleased to announce the 17th annual University of Virginia Law Library Art Show, “The Courtroom Sketches of Ida Libby Dengrove.” The opening reception for the exhibit was Thursday, September 4.

A court sketch from the Ida Libby Dengrove exhibit.
A court sketch from the Ida Libby Dengrove exhibit.

This year’s featured artist, Ida Libby Dengrove (1919-2005), was an Emmy award-winning courtroom sketch artist for WNBC-TV in New York City during the 1970s and 80s. Cameras in courtrooms were strictly prohibited then, and the only visual representations of inside-the-court events available to news media were the renderings of sketch artists. Dengrove’s masterful drawings brought viewing audiences closer to the newsworthy trials of the day, including those of Mark David Chapman, John Hinckley, the “Son of Sam,” John Gotti, the Mayflower Madame, the Quinlans, Mafia dons, and many others. The art show features 118 sketches documenting 60 trials, while our online exhibit features nearly 6,000 digital images rendered from Dengrove’s works. We are grateful to the Dengrove family for the generous gift of this collection, which will remain on display in the Arthur J. Morris Law Library through May 2015.

– Amy Wharton     

 

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Amy Wharton

Amy Wharton has been the Research & Web Services / Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library at the University of Virginia School of Law since 2008.

Virginia Appellate Judges Advise Legal Researchers, “Know Your Audience”

“What one piece of advice would you provide to attorneys who are presenting legal research in a brief or memo to your court?” U.Va. Law Librarian Ben Doherty asked this question of the justices and judges of the Supreme Court of Virginia, the Virginia Court of Appeals, and the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Doherty’s article, “appellate Research Lessons from the Judges,” was published in this month’s Virginia Lawyer. It contains valuable tips from the judges, such as “analyze the cases, don’t just find them.” It’s must reading for anyone who wants to persuade judges without committing errors that can detract from the merits of an argument.

The December issue of the Virginia Lawyer features seven articles written on a range of topics by Doherty and other members of the Virginia Association of Law Libraries (VALL). 

– Amy Wharton  

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Amy Wharton

Amy Wharton has been the Research & Web Services / Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library at the University of Virginia School of Law since 2008.

A Glimpse of the Past, A Peek at the Future

For the first time, the annual Alumni Reunions Weekend program included a program by Law Library. Last Saturday in the library’s Caplin Reading Room, staff members Philip Herrington, Elizabeth Ladner, and Kristin Jensen presented “Capturing the Past, Preserving the Future: People, Places, and Pedagogy.” The program featured fellow Philip Herrington’s look at the history of U.Va. Law School as place. Herrington began with the law program’s early years as a class offering in a Lawn pavilion and a collection of law books in the Rotunda Annex. He then chronicled how the school became its own place at Minor Hall, but overcrowding and a passion for murals soon led to the building of the more spacious Clark Hall. The Law School continued to grow and eventually moved to North Grounds, where several expansion projects transformed the structure into the place it is today. Elizabeth Ladner, also a Law Library fellow, illustrated U.Va. Law School as a curriculum, exploring how Thomas Jefferson’s uncommon hiring of a single law professor for undergraduates evolved over time into free standing professional graduate school. Kristin Jensen then explored U.Va. Law School as a story, as told through student and faculty memorabilia and writings. Among the interesting artifacts Jensen shared were letters home from Elizabeth Tompkins, the Law School’s first female graduate, which revealed her struggle to find her place among the men of her 1L class.

At the close of the program, Director Taylor Fitchett issued standing invitation to alumni to share their own U.Va. Law stories and memorabilia. She shared her hope that our past students will come to regard any law school books or class notes stored in their attics, as well as their personal stories, as welcome future additions to the U.Va. Law School history. If you’re an alumnus or past faculty member with something to share about your U.Va. Law experience, please contact Taylor Fitchett at tf2u@virginia.edu or at http://libguides.law.virginia.edu/alumni.

– Amy Wharton 

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Amy Wharton

Amy Wharton has been the Research & Web Services / Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library at the University of Virginia School of Law since 2008.

“They’re Like Individual Fortresses!”

New Carrels September 2011 - ch That’s what one library user said when she first noticed our brand new study carrels on the second floor. They do offer the privacy of a miniature fortress, but you won’t have to cross a moat to reach them. They’re open, airy and comfortable, with new high quality adjustable chairs. Each of the twenty carrels is individually lighted and features four electrical outlets so you can plug in at will. These carrels are non-reserve and may be used on a first-come, first-seated basis. We hope you will enjoy them!

– Amy Wharton

 

 

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Amy Wharton

Amy Wharton has been the Research & Web Services / Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library at the University of Virginia School of Law since 2008.

Both Then and Now, a Celebration with “Great Éclat”

Yesterday the University celebrated founder Thomas Jefferson’s 268th birthday. Among the events were a tree planting on The Lawn and the annual awarding of three Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medals. The presentation of the Medal in Law has been a Founder’s Day tradition since 1977, the year the current honoree, Virginia Supreme Court Chief Justice Cynthia Kinser, graduated from the Law School.  

Founder’s Day has always been celebrated in style at the University. An entry from the diaries of Law School Dean William Minor Lile reveals how the event was observed 87 years ago, an interesting time in the history of our nation and in that of our neighbor up the street, Monticello:

“April 12, 1924

“Tomorrow being Sunday, Jefferson’s birthday was celebrated today with great éclat, with Governor Trinkle present. Dr. [John Holladay] Latané of Johns Hopkins delivered the address on the great Democrat. It was a very thoughtful study, including an interesting comparison between Jefferson and Woodrow Wilson; and pointing out in a striking way what Jefferson meant by ‘entangling alliances’, by extracts from his letter indicating that at one time he was heartily in favor of an alliance with Great Britain. 

“In addition to our own University celebration, the Jefferson Memorial Association which has recently purchased Monticello @ $500.000.00, $100.000.00 only paid thus far, is here in full force, including 50 boys and girls from the schools of New York City, prize winners in a contest for the best 50 essays on Jefferson. Tomorrow there will be a pilgrimage to Monticello with all sorts of stunts to be performed on the Monticello lawn, including an oration by the Governor, orations by sundry other notables from different sections of the country, all in the line of propaganda for raising money for the purchase and endowment. A hard surfaced road has just been completed to the top of the mountain, but the road from the gate to the mansion, and particularly the return road on the eastern side, is in bad shape and scarcely manageable for cars. Seaplanes would come in well for the return trip back to the gate. I hope that by the time my grandchildren are ready to make a trip to the shrine of Democracy, the place will be paid for, a sufficient endowment provided, and the place will be put in a condition worthy of the great man who from that center evolved and disseminated a political philosophy that has influenced the whole world for the world’s good, probably more than any man that ever lived on the planet we call earth, excluding of course Jesus of Nazareth.” 

We take the absence of recent seaplane sightings over Charlottesville as solid evidence that Dean Lile’s hopes for Monticello have been realized.

– Amy Wharton, with Kristin Jensen

Published by

Amy Wharton

Amy Wharton has been the Research & Web Services / Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Arthur J. Morris Law Library at the University of Virginia School of Law since 2008.